Knight Blog

The blog of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation

Igniting new thinking about the future of philanthropy

Nov. 9, 2012, 11:41 a.m., Posted by Elizabeth R. Miller

Knight Foundation and several of its partners will be at the Independent Sector's annual conference starting this Sunday in San Francisco. Over several days, the conference will feature game changing people, events and ideas to ignite new thinking on the future of charitable sector. 

Sunday's luncheon plenary conversation will focus on what lies ahead for America after the election dust settles. The conversation will be moderated by Knight Foundation President & CEO, Alberto Ibargüen, with speakers Matt Miller of the Washington Post, Arturo Vargas, of the National Association of Latino Elected Officials and Ken Harbaugh, of ServiceNation. It will consider how the 2012 election results will shape the nation's future and how they will affect communities.
 The plenary will be emceed by Steve McCormick of the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation
. 

Also on Sunday at 2 p.m. PT, Knight Foundation trustee Mariam Noland will moderate a breakout session on strategic leadership for nonprofits. Led by Professor James Phills, director of the Executive Program in Social Entrepreneurship at Stanford University
, it will focus on how creating strategic change is one of the most critical challenges that CEOs face today. Phills will draw from his research and consulting experience to illustrate the psychological and organizational barriers that can get in the way.

Belinda Lawrence, Knight's vice president/chief administrative officer, will co-facilitate a breakout session with Barbara Kibbe of Salesforce.com.  "Move the Needle By Thinking Better Together" will explore ways those in the sector work together to meet needs and address tough challenges.

On Monday, at 10:15 a.m. PT, Knight Foundation's Vice President/Strategy and Assessment, Mayur Patel, will be on a panel about how using data effectively can lead to innovation and better decision making. The conversation will explore ways to harness new and existing data to increase impact.
 Other discussion participants will be Kevin Bolduc, The Center for Effective Philanthropy, Elizabeth Boris, National Center for Charitable Statistics, Urban Institute, Nancy Lublin, Do Something, Inc., Rebecca Masisak, TechSoup, Elizabeth Pastor, Humantific;  Jake Porway, DataKind and Jennifer Sigler, GlobalGiving Foundation
. Fay Twersky, The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation will faciliate the conversation.

Meet the 2013 Knight-Mozilla OpenNews Fellows

Nov. 8, 2012, 12:33 p.m., Posted by Mozilla Foundation

fellows

Knight supports the OpenNews project to accelerate media innovation by embedding technologists in news organizations. Below, Dan Sinker introduces us to the newest group of fellows. The following is crossposted from mozillaopennews.org

This week, I've been blogging about what we've accomplished with the Knight-Mozilla OpenNews project, and where we're going in 2013. But that 2013 plan left a big chunk out. So let's fill in the blank:

When talking about the OpenNews project, I describe it as an ecosystem. All of our programs are interdependent: Hack Days and Code Sprints and Source--they all work together to build, implement, and document new experiments at the intersection of journalism and code. But the living, breathing heart at the center of it all is our Fellowship program.

When Knight Foundation and Mozilla decided to form a partnership around journalism and the open web, the Fellowship program was conceived as a way of bringing the open-source development ethos right into the center of the newsroom. As the OpenNews project evolved, I saw the Fellowship as serving a different aim as well: To bring new talent into the journalism-code community, in the hopes of growing the number of technologists interested in building anew in journalism.

In 2012, we had five incredible talents who brought their unique ideas and perspectives to some of the world's best newsrooms. They built next-generation multimedia tools, real-time social sharing analysisstreaming transcription systems, and even picked up bylines along the way in some of the most influential news sites in the world. They traveled the globe attending hack days, sharing their tools, and collaborating on new ideas both big and small.

2012 was our pilot year for the Fellowship program. In 2013, we go big: We increase our fellows from five to eight, and expanded our partner newsrooms to the New York Times and ProPublicain New York, the BBC and the Guardian in the UK, Zeit Online and Spiegel Online in Germany, the Boston Globe (guess where), and La Nacion in Buenos Aires, Argentina. These are incredible news organizations and we're thrilled to be able to build new things with them.

We ran our 2013 Fellowship search differently than last year: It was a straight call, honed to developers, technologists, data scientists, math geeks, and others. We promoted it massively over the summer, and ended up with twice as many applicants as we were expecting--more than 20x the slots we had to fill. To narrow that huge number down, we submitted a list of the most qualified 56 to our news partners, who then identified a total of 40 semifinalists. Erika Owens, OpenNews's community manager, and I conducted short, standardized interviews with all 40 semifinalists to build out a more complete candidate profile. About 20 hours of calls later, we submitted all of our notes back to our news partners. They then selected three candidates a piece for hour-long conversations.

Getting to 56 was hard, getting to 40 even harder, and getting to that final list of 24 was nearly impossible (there were surprisngly few overlaps throughout the process). But, after another 24 hours of calls spread across a minimum of three timezones (often four), we arrived at final picks in mid-October.

And today, we get to introduce them to you. I seriously can not wait:

Knight honored for strengthening community in Charlotte

Nov. 8, 2012, 11:16 a.m., Posted by Knight Foundation

Knight Foundation was recently honored  by the Association of Fundraising Professionals Charlotte Chapter as the Outstanding Philanthropic Organization in the city.

For the last 20 years on National Philanthropy Day, the association has recognized individuals and organizations for their commitment to the sector. More than 500 attended this year’s awards luncheon.

Susan Patterson, program director/Charlotte at Knight Foundation, accepted the award. “I was honored to represent Knight at this event,” she said, “but as I told our many nonprofit partners in the room, we wanted to use this opportunity to salute them and all that they do to make our community such a wonderful place to live, work and play.”

Knight has invested more than $75 million in the Charlotte community since making its first grant in 1969. 

For the last 20 years on National Philanthropy Day, the association has recognized individuals and organizations for their commitment to the sector. More than 500 attended this year’s awards luncheon.

Susan Patterson, program director/Charlotte at Knight Foundation, accepted the award. “I was honored to represent Knight at this event,” she said, “but as I told our many nonprofit partners in the room, we wanted to use this opportunity to salute them and all that they do to make our community such a wonderful place to live, work and play.”

Knight has invested more than $75 million in the Charlotte community since making its first grant in 1969.

The foundation was nominated by one of its grantees, the Community School of the Arts. Former winners selected the nine awardees.